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Sutton Hoo

Last week, my husband and I drove up to Woodbridge in Suffolk, to visit the early Anglo-Saxon burial ground that is Sutton Hoo. From our home in Essex its a nice drive, and only took about forty minutes :)As everyone knows, after Rome fell in 410 ad, the British Isles became a dangerous, wild land where the native Britons roamed. Forest covered much of the landscape so it was easy to hide away, perhaps escape the violence that was murder, rape and pillage, and if the Welsh legends are to be believed then it was around this time that King Uther was ruling the land (or some of it - there is a settlement called Pendragon Castle in Cumbria, and this could've been his seat of power). When Uther died, his son: Arthur, ruled England (as a legitimate crowned King, no-one knows), and it was at this time that folk from eastern Europe began to settle in the country - from Saxony, Jutland and Angeln. Now, because a lot of History cannot be proved for certain in these early centuries, I won't go into too much detail as this represents guesswork and too much folklore, but it can easily be said that by the sixth-seventh centuries Englalond was divided into various sections and was ruled by different chieftains. This is where Sutton Hoo comes in. By the seventh century, a King named Redwald was ruling East Anglia and of the Wuffingas dynasty (his grandsire: Wuffa, was the first King of the East Angles), and this King Redwald was buried at Sutton Hoo within a ship in the ground with various possessions. Although he'd been baptised, Redwald still wished to be buried the old, pagan way, and thus remained in peace for years.

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As you can see it was a beautiful day :)

outfit;
blouse - topshop (£16)
skirt - topshop (£7 in the sale)
bag - topshop (£20 in the sale)

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