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Magna Carta Exhibition

On the 21st May, myself and the boy travelled to The British Library for the Magna Carta exhibition. I'd booked the tickets well in advance (in Feb!), so all we had to do was pay the extortionate train fare.
We had a packed lunch in the sunshine before going inside, and I had my bottle of water promptly taken away from me upon entering the exhibition! This has happened to me many times (most notably at Reading Festival when my bodyspray was snatched).

The exhibition itself was wonderful - lots of Anglo-Norman and Latin texts, videos and images, and one of the Magna Cartas itself at the very end.
I skipped past a lot of of the American Bill of Rights stuff as it was quite tedious. I am aware of the importance of the document, its just that I don't care for it (like a lot of WW1 and WW2 history).

As a History student and budding novelist, this was very useful for me.
But even if you're not a History lover, it is interesting. Its the most important piece of legislation in the world - and its from England *smug face*.

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Magna Carta prevented Kings of England from tyranny, and from bestowing illegal tax on the people of England.
By the reign of King Henry III (John's son), Magna Carta was largely ignored and The Provisions of Oxford were introduced by Henry's brother in law, Simon de Montfort at the "Mad Parliament". A council of 15 were chosen to have authority over Henry, but within a few years it was rendered useless when Henry again refused to abide by it.

Henry regained power!

Anyway, I have gone on a tangent. I might pick up on this point in another blog post.

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