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Pleshey Castle

Last Sunday, myself and the boy visited the earthworks of the motte and bailey castle that is Pleshey. The land itself has not been interfered with much since its construction after duke William's victory at the battle of Hastings, so there were many knolls and steep slopes. The castle does not exist today (as to be expected).

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The land is now private, so we were actually very lucky to be able to go and visit. I had not understood exactly why it is not open to the public, but I soon found out. A bridge exists over the fosse which has the potential to cause many an accident. This bridge conjoins the man-made motte (hill), with what we see today as a green hilly clearing (the boy called it a sun-trap - it was very hot on Sunday).

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The event we attended, was a medieval fayre. There were market stalls, a jester, and a kind of fashion show, which focused on what folk wore in the 12/13 century.
The reason this fayre focused on this period, is because of the 800th anniversary of the signing of Magna Carta. Geoffrey de Mandeville was one of the barons who forced King John into signing the great charter at Runnymede in 1215, and was residing at Pleshey Castle at this point.

If you wish to find out more, click here - pleshey castle

The dress I am wearing is from Topshop, and was purchased last year in a sale (about £20).

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